Movie Review: Little Women, a film by Greta Gerwig

Men must see the film LITTLE WOMEN currently in theatres (Opened Christmas Day).

 I just got back from seeing LITTLE WOMEN for the second time and, once again, I was so captivated by the performances and the beauty of the film. I enjoyed it even more the second time. It is a timeless story about family, togetherness, hope and ambition and mostly about love in all its many forms. Though I am blessed and content as a celibate priest there were moments in the film that I simply melted witnessing how feminine energy can captivate a person and how easy it would be to fall in love with any of the March women. There are a couple moments in the film where you see the male characters standing at attention in awe of the interaction of mother and daughters. The moments are priceless and I daresay must prove indicative of most people’s reaction to the movie.

A note to married men and those seeking marriage: You will appreciate your wife and woman friend all the more after seeing this movie: The Wonder of the Feminine” is in full display here –its strengths, its solidarity, its honesty about the friendship and competition among sisters–not so unlike that of brothers (Surprise!) and their love for men in the special sense of all humankind but also their appreciation and respect for the marked differences between us.


This new film written and directed by Greta Gerwig also highlights the way echoes of the 19th Century limitations upon women continually need to be addressed for men and women in society today for we are not yet true partners at home, at work nor in our collective mission to make this a better world, lovingly, respectfully and with integrity. There’s also some important social commentary about the proper and improper use of wealth but I’ll let Meryl Streep’s characterization of Aunt March spell that out for you. (Streep is amazing as always in a significantly minor role.)

All performances are luminous and completely “right,” but three stand out for me:  Saoirse Ronan as Jo, Florence Pugh as Amy and Laura Dern as “Marmee” (“mother”).   Timothée Chalamet as Laurie, (“the boy next store” and devoted friend) is also excellent, especially in the scene he confesses undying love to Jo.  Gerwig’s script gives them great opportunities to be “REAL” and the way the script and editing move back and from within a seven-year time period adds layers of perspective that adds to the insights this family drama offers.  Cinematography, Set Design and Costumes are A+. A fine score, too, by Alexander Desplat.


GO SEE THIS MOVIE with as many men and women and young people as you can. I’d say age 10 and up. And then read the book and DISCUSS it with women and men, boys and girls because it is not only about girlhood, womanhood but about life and death, love and ambition, inner and outer conflicts, timidity and boldness–i.e. it’s for everyone. I believe it needs to be back on the school’s reading lists, too. When I was a student teacher long ago, I put it on my reading list for high school freshmen but didn’t get the chance to teach it. Perhaps it would have become a deterrent to my vocation. Evidently God had other plans for me, but I shall continue to appreciate and enjoy the story and the women in my life always and always.

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